How to find Winnie-the-Pooh in the Ashdown Forest

winnie the pooh ashdown forest

How would you like to go on a Winnie-the-Pooh hunt in the Ashdown Forest? Pooh’s adventures with Christopher Robin, Piglet and Eeyore are some of the world’s favourite children’s stories. You’ve got to love a bear of very little brain who is rather too fond of honey. A bear who goes hunting for woozles and heffalumps and always stops at eleven in the morning for “a little something”.

A.A.Milne, the author of the Pooh books, lived near the village of Hartfield in East Sussex on the edge of the Ashdown Forest and based the Hundred Acre Wood on real places in the forest. E.H.Shepard based the books’ illustrations on actual places there.

Ninety years after the publication of the first book, you can still go on your very own Winnie-the-Pooh expedition to the Ashdown Forest. The gorse bushes that Pooh flies so gracefully into at the beginning of the book are there. You can find the pine trees that Tigger tried to climb or the beech tree where Owl lived. You can play Poohsticks on the very same bridge as Pooh and Piglet, go on an expotition to the North Pole and try to count the trees in the Enchanting Place at the top of the forest.

Let me show you how to find Winnie-the-Pooh in the Ashdown Forest.

How to get to the Poohsticks Bridge 

Drive through the village of Hartfield and turn left at the signpost towards the B2026 and Maresfield. This is the road that goes through the Ashdown Forest. After a mile and a half you’ll come to Chuck Hatch. Turn right at the sign for Marsh Green and Newbridge. The Pooh Car Park is a bit further down on your right.

Follow the path out of the car park into the woods. It’s a relatively easy walk and you’ll pass tree stumps to climb and play on along the way. It’s best to start gathering fallen sticks to use as Poohsticks while you walk – there’s far more here than there are once you get to the bridge.

About half way down on your right, see if you can find Owl’s House high up in the branches of one of the trees. Look carefully and you might be able to read Owl’s instructions on the door. Further down, you’ll find lots of sticks which are perfect for building dens if you want to spend longer here either on the way there or on the way back.

winnie the pooh ashdown forestYou’ll reach the bridge after about 15 minutes. This is where Christopher Robin first played pooh sticks with his father, and it’s later described in The House at Pooh Corner when Pooh plays the game with Christopher Robin, Tigger and Eeyore.

To play, all you have to do is drop your stick into the water from one side of the bridge, run to the other side and see whose stick comes under the bridge first. It’s simple but addictive.

Just across the bridge there used to be a dead tree with a little wooden door with brass hinges hidden at the bottom of the trunk. There was even a Pooh wedged firmly inside with a couple of pots of honey and letters from fans. Unfortunately the tree has now been taken down along with the little door. I do hope that one day this will return to the same spot – it made the trip to the Pooh Bridge so much more special.

The circular walk around Pooh’s Enchanting Spots

The second Winnie-the-Pooh walk in the Ashdown Forest is one of our favourites and takes about an hour and a half if you stop to admire all the Pooh sites along the way. We always take a picnic to have in the forest.

From the Poohsticks Bridge, drive back onto the B2026 towards Maresfield and after about three minutes you’ll come to a car park called Gill’s Lap on your right.

Walk into the forest, keeping the road on your right. Walk past the pine trees and along the grassy track. There are fantastic views over the forest from here and various benches to sit on and admire the view. Keep walking until you reach the tall group of pine trees on your right. This is Gill’s Lap, called Galleon’s Lap in the Pooh books.

“They walked on, thinking of This and That, and by-and-by they came to an enchanted place on the very top of the Forest called Galleon’s Lap, which is sixty-something trees in a circle; and Christopher Robin knew that it was enchanted because nobody had ever been able to count whether it was sixty-three or sixty-four, not even when he tied a piece of string round each tree after he had counted it.”

The House at Pooh Corner – A.A.Milne

In his book, The Enchanted Places, Christopher Milne, the original Christopher Robin, describes how he could see Gill’s Lap from his nursery window. He describes it as “an enchanted spot before ever Pooh came along to add to its magic.” It still looks exactly like it does in Shepard’s illustration.

Just outside Gill’s Lap you can see a concrete pillar. This is a Trig Point, an Ordnance Survey triangulation stone. These can be found on high ground all over the UK and used to be used for the metrical survey of Britain.

After you’ve had a go at counting the trees, walk to the bench outside Gill’s Lap and in front of you you’ll see a little path going through the gorse. Follow the track and you’ll come to what looks very much like The Heffalump Trap. The path dips down into a hollowed out area around a pine tree, very similar to where Pooh tried to trap the Heffalump, after suspecting that they’re after his pots of honey.

“Pooh’s first idea was that they should dig a Very Deep Pit, and that the Heffalump would come along and fall into the Pit . . . Pooh rubbed his nose with his paw, and said that the Heffalump might be walking along, humming a little song, and looking up at the sky, wondering if it would rain, and so he wouldn’t see the Very Deep Pit until he was halfway down, when it would be too late.”

Winnie-the-Pooh – A.A.Milne

This makes a good spot for a picnic – provided you don’t bring honey sandwiches which might attract those pesky heffalumps…

winnie the pooh ashdown forest enchanted placeWalk back up the track towards Gill’s Lap and turn left along the original path. As the path starts to slope downwards you’ll come to a spot with a marvellous view over the forest and a large memorial stone dedicated to A.A. Milne and E.H.Shepard, who illustrated the Pooh books. The stone describes how they “captured the magic of Ashdown Forest and gave it to the world.” This is The Enchanted Place and was especially chosen by Christopher Robin Milne to commemorate Winnie the Pooh’s connection with the Ashdown Forest.

Go back up the path. Just before Gill’s Lap on your left you’ll see a disused sandstone quarry. This is Roo’s Sandy Pit. Walk around the edge, keeping the quarry on your left and you’ll reach a path leading to the main road. You’ll see a sign with Quarry on it. Cross over the road and turn left onto a grassy track. The track curves to the right and in front of you you’ll see the open heathland of the forest.

Follow the path to the bottom of the hill. You’re now on Pooh’s Expotition to the North Pole. The North Pole is hidden among the trees where the two sides of the valley meet. Just before you reach the bridge at the bottom, turn left and walk alongside the stream. After about 45 metres you’ll reach an area with a series of small waterfalls and little ponds. It was somewhere just like this where Roo fell into the water during Christopher Robin’s expotition to the North Pole. Pooh and Kanga saved him by fishing him out with a pole and Christopher Robin declares this pole to be the North Pole.

Now walk back to the bridge, cross it and walk up the steep hill. This is the hardest part of the walk as it’s a bit of a slog all the way to the top. This is quite a popular riding trail so watch out for horse riders coming towards you. Once you reach the top the path turns to the right and it’s a nice easy walk from here on.

We often stop here for a picnic. There are lots of lone pine trees dotted across the heath. It’s fun to see if you can find Tigger’s Tree, the tree that Tigger fell out of when he was trying to prove that Tiggers can climb trees “Much better than Poohs”. Look at Shepard’s drawings of Winnie-the-Pooh in the Ashdown Forest and you’ll see that it’s remarkable how similar the landscape still looks, 90 years later.

As you walk, look across to your right and you’ll see Gill’s Lap where you started off. The path eventually veers to the right and wends its way back towards the road which, when you cross it, will bring you back to the car park where you started.

Pooh Corner

Now, if you’re anything like Pooh and Piglet you’ll be needing “a little smackerel of something” so you should drive back into Hartfield and head for Pooh Corner. This little shop sells the largest selection of Pooh products anywhere in the world including maps and walks around the various Winnie the Pooh sights in the forest. The tea room is an excellent place for toast and honey, a crumpet or a clotted cream tea. The garden is a good spot on a sunny day and we can thoroughly recommend Piglet’s Cream Tea, a pot of tea with a scone, clotted cream and jam for a very reasonable £4.

And remember: “in that enchanted place on the top of the Forest a little boy and his Bear will always be playing.”

Have you found Winnie-the-Pooh in the Ashdown Forest?

Did you know that you can see the real Winnie-the-Pooh bear in New York? Find out where to find Edward Bear by reading my guide to visiting New York with children.

For more ideas and inspiration for following in the footsteps of your favourite literary characters, take a look at The Harry Potter Guide to London, Where to Find the Ten Best Harry Potter Locations in the UK and On the Trail of Harry Potter in Lacock.

For more inspiration on exploring Sussex, take a look at How to Explore Sussex with Kids.

How to find Winnie the Pooh in the Ashdown Forest in Sussex, UK, the real Hundred Acre Wood. Detailed walking guide to Pooh Bridge, Owl's House, Heffalump Trap, Pooh's house and the Enchanting Places. #winniethepoohasdownforest #poohwalkashdownforest #hundredacrewood #poohbridge #familytraveluk #childrensbooklocations #poohwalk #poohforest

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84 Comments

  1. 29th March 2017 / 10:20 pm

    Pooh Bear is a favourite in our house and pooh sticks is such a fun game. We still play this game whenever we find ourselves on a bridge… love it! Thanks for such a gorgeous post Clare πŸ™‚

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:21 pm

      You have to play Pooh sticks when you’re on a bridge, don’t you? Reckon I’ll be still doing it when I’m 90! Thanks so much for your lovely comment.

      • David Giezyng
        30th May 2021 / 11:25 pm

        I played poohsticks today in Michigan. There is a bridge nearby and I thought why not.

        • Clare Thomson
          Author
          15th June 2021 / 9:52 am

          Why not indeed? Poohsticks is fun whatever age you are. Thanks for commenting.

  2. 30th March 2017 / 8:17 am

    I knew nothing about this – looks like a must for winniethe pooh fans #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:23 pm

      It really is so much fun – and a great way to encourage the kids to go out for a rather long walk πŸ™‚

  3. 30th March 2017 / 8:21 am

    I love this!! I never knew about this Winnie the Pooh trail, but I would love to do it one day. I’ll remember to bring a fan letter to add to the collection when I do. #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:24 pm

      That’s a sweet idea! Last time I went there was just the little door – the Pooh bear, pots of honey and letters are all quite new I think.

  4. 30th March 2017 / 8:24 am

    How wonderfully charming! I had no idea that 100 acre wood was actually based on a real place. What a lovely thing to do, to follow in the footsteps of Pooh and friends. I love the tree with the little door and Pooh inside. This would be such a brilliant place to go with little ones and of course the Piglet tea afterwards would be perfect! #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:25 pm

      It’s a walk we absolutely love doing, Jo. It’s extraordinary how similar the forest looks to Shepard’s original illustrations. We were so delighted to find the little door near the Pooh bridge – it’s not written about in the guide to the Pooh walks either so it felt like a secret discovery.

  5. 30th March 2017 / 9:08 am

    Just wonderful Clare! Book us in for a visit please – my kids would adore this. I can feel the excitement already. I will bring β€œa little smackerel of something”

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:28 pm

      You must. It’s a lot of fun and every adventure should begin and end with “a little smackerel of something” in my opinion.

  6. 30th March 2017 / 9:13 am

    Oh what a wonderful post – I loved Winnie the Pooh growing up, and have loved reading it to my daughter event more. We’ve played poohsticks in so many places but never the original, so I think we need a day out here to follow your instructions for our own expotition. #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:29 pm

      Thanks so much Cathy. We’re very much into expotitions in our house, particularly when accompanied by honey and an adventure. Pooh sticks is addictive – it’s such a pretty bridge to do it from too.

  7. 30th March 2017 / 9:36 am

    Awwwwnnn. I really had no idea that the story was based on true places. Winnie the Pooh is a classic and well loved by my family. And this is a perfect way to get outside! My theme for the week. #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:32 pm

      It is absolutely the perfect way to get outside. Ashdown Forest is a great place for walking whether you’re on a Pooh trail or not. Of course the Winnie the Pooh sites make it all the more special for us.

  8. 30th March 2017 / 10:11 am

    So adorable and so fun to read about this history of the story! I never knew that! I love how there is even the little door in the tree! #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:39 pm

      It was so special to find that door! The first time we found it there was no Pooh but this last weekend someone had added Pooh and all his pots of honey. Very sweet.

  9. 30th March 2017 / 10:30 am

    Such a lovely post Clare. Is there a family alive who doesn’t love Winnie the Pooh? (Well, let’s say a family in the English speaking Western world perhaps to clarify a little bit because I guess there might be some who haven’t heard of him in the Amazon or steppes of central Asia…perhaps?) I knew AA Milne’s books were based on real places and people so this is just wonderful to have it all explained. #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:41 pm

      Thank you so much. I do think most kids in our world have grown up with the wonderful Winnie-the-Pooh and it’s so special to find out that the illustrations are so similar to the landscape of the forest A.A.Milne lived on the edge of. We go often.

  10. 30th March 2017 / 10:53 am

    This is so cool, Clare! I had no clue that the stories of Pooh were inspired and based upon a real place. These stories have captivated us for generations, so I imagine that this would be a very popular family travel destination. What a perfect place to explore with kids! Thanks for letting me know it even existed! #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:46 pm

      Thanks so much, Ali. It’s a great place to explore with kids. My two are far more likely to get excited about a walk if we’re off searching for places that have inspired books they’ve enjoyed – and who doesn’t love Pooh and Piglet?

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:46 pm

      Thank you πŸ™‚

  11. 30th March 2017 / 11:49 am

    To me that looks like a great way of getting the kids to go on a walk without ever saying “let’s go for a walk” which never works around here! I had heard of this place but I didn’t know if it was worth visiting. It looks very good and of course if there is somewhere for a little smackerel of something at the end, that’s ideal. #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:48 pm

      That’s exactly it, Janet! My two love doing this walk and having an adventure rather than just going on a walk. We always have to have a msackerel of something at the end of course! It’s lovely to have you join Faraway Files.

  12. 30th March 2017 / 11:50 am

    Lovely post and u have given me a destination idea I would never have considered. I reckon I will be bouncing along like Tigger! Wilbur #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:49 pm

      Thanks so much, Wilbur. Bouncing along like Tigger is positively compulsory on this walk!

  13. 30th March 2017 / 12:14 pm

    I had no idea that the locations in the book were real places. That just makes it all the more fun. Winnie the Pooh is a favorite character of mine and has been since I was a kid. #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:51 pm

      You’d be amazed how much the real locations look like the drawings in Shepard’s illustrations, Allison. It makes it all the more special.

  14. 30th March 2017 / 2:04 pm

    Awe so cute! I had no clue that the location was based on a real location! And I love that they made the forest almost “interactive” for Pooh fans!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:52 pm

      Absolutely Christine. My kids have so much fun here and it’s never that busy.

  15. 30th March 2017 / 2:24 pm

    Oh what an absolute treat! I love a game of pooh-sticks and to play it on *the* bridge would be wonderful! We are sometimes in this neck of the woods visiting family, I will be sure to remember to visit.

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:54 pm

      We love Pooh sticks too and that bridge is such a special place to do it. The walk through the woods makes it more of an exciting trip.

  16. 30th March 2017 / 5:46 pm

    My daughter would have loved this when she was little! #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:59 pm

      My two love it so much. Actually the Ashdown Forest is a great place for a walk whatever age you are!

  17. 30th March 2017 / 5:48 pm

    I have no idea that. It looks like a great place for a trip with children. Thanks for sharing. #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      30th March 2017 / 7:59 pm

      You’re welcome, Tomas. It’s a wonderful place to go with kids. Great to have you join Faraway Files.

  18. 30th March 2017 / 9:41 pm

    This is such a sweet and clever post, Clare. I had heard before that the 100 acre wood was based on a real place (perhaps from you?!), but had not actually seen it yet (until your Insta posts of course ;)). I know what my daughter is reading before bed tonight – this! #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:34 pm

      Thanks so much, Corey. Hope your daughter liked it too. It strikes me every time we visit the forest that it’s so very similar to Shepard’s original illustrations for the Pooh books. These are absolutely real places and I love how they have stayed the same after 90 years.

  19. 30th March 2017 / 9:54 pm

    What a lovely idea! I never knew about it. It looks like such a lovely day out . Thanks for sharing xx

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:35 pm

      Thanks so much. It really is a lovely day out. One of the best.

  20. 31st March 2017 / 3:13 am

    Oh my! I am fascinated with this post since I adore Winnie the Pooh. My first book featured Pooh, Tigger, Roo and the rest of the gang. I had no idea a place related to their adventures exists. This forest is gorgeous! So nice you had the opportunity to visit (and I would like to do that too). #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:36 pm

      When I was researching this post I took my own first Winnie-the-Pooh book out and found that it had been inscribed ‘To Clare, on your fourth birthday’. These are such special books and the forest is wonderful for walks, inspired by Pooh and all his friends.

  21. 31st March 2017 / 4:20 am

    I didn’t know about this place! I always find it fascinating to visit the places that inspired movies and books! I can imagine it being especially exciting if you’re a big fan of the Winnie the Pooh!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:37 pm

      We love visiting places inspired by books too and Winnie-the-Pooh is one of our absolute favourites which makes this forest so special to us.

  22. 31st March 2017 / 9:56 am

    What a charming idea — to follow in the steps of Winnie the Pooh! We love a circular walk and how wonderful it would be to have a picnic at that spot, with those views. Perhaps we could bring along A.A. Milne to read aloud… πŸ™‚ #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:38 pm

      I do like the idea of bringing the book to read aloud – and some honey of course! We often take picnics on our walks – it does make it that bit more special. Lovely to have you joining us on #FarawayFiles

  23. 1st April 2017 / 7:58 am

    We love Winnie the Pooh in our house, and I’ll definitely be showing this post to my boys! I sang the Winnie the Pooh song to my older son almost every night for years. I’m not sure If I knew the stories were based on a real place or not, but I’m delighted to learn that one can actually visit the hundred acre wood! Amazing! #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:50 pm

      That is so sweet about singing the winnie-the-pooh song, Hilary. As you know, I’ve still got to watch the film myself. It sounds like the sort of song that’s going to stick in my head for a long time to come! Visiting the real Hundred Acre Wood is really special. It’s one of our favourite family walks.

  24. 1st April 2017 / 9:48 pm

    Those trees look exactly like the one Tigger fell out off! I’ve always avoided going to Ashdown just in case it wasn’t as my imagination has it, but seeing your pictures makes me want to go. #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:51 pm

      I know! There are so many that look just perfect for Tigger to fall out on. You really should visit the Ashdown Forest Catherine – I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

  25. 3rd April 2017 / 12:33 am

    This is so cute! I didn’t know any of this Winney the Pooh history that really neat.
    #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:52 pm

      Thanks so much, Natalie.

  26. 3rd April 2017 / 4:19 am

    Oh this is fantastic! I had read Winnie the Pooh but never knew that it was based on an actual site. It must have been fun to walk along the trails as if we were in the same adventures as Pooh and his friends! #farawayfiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd April 2017 / 7:52 pm

      It is fun pretending you’re having those same adventures. We have actually tried to catch a heffalump – hasn’t worked yet, sadly.

  27. 3rd April 2017 / 8:25 pm

    What a lovely place to visit. I particularly like that people have left messages with Pooh and his honey pots. #FarawayFiles

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      4th April 2017 / 7:35 pm

      I know! It’s so sweet, isn’t it? I think some people actually leave little pots of honey!

      • 28th September 2017 / 9:52 am

        Aww bless them #MondayEscapes

        • Clare Thomson
          Author
          2nd October 2017 / 4:54 pm

          It’s such a sweet trip to do with children.

  28. 4th April 2017 / 4:15 pm

    This is so cute! Yet another great idea of how to help kids enjoy travel!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      4th April 2017 / 7:35 pm

      Thanks Chiera. It certainly makes it easy to get them outside and enjoying a walk.

  29. Paula
    14th September 2017 / 9:08 pm

    I just found your post! I have been wanting to visit Pooh’s old neighborhood for a long time and hope to make the trip in 2018. I have a couple of questions, though. I’m coming from the US and had not planned to rent a car. It is easy to get to the Ashdown Forest with public transportation and once there, do I need a car? I’m an avid walker so don’t mind walking a lot. I had not planned to rent a car while in England. Also, would you recommend that I spend the night in the area rather than try to do it in a day trip from London?
    Thank you!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      22nd September 2017 / 2:29 pm

      Hi Paula, thanks so much for commenting. The Ashdown Forest is such a wonderful place to visit, made even more special when you can see all the Winnie-the-Pooh sites too. You can get trains to East Grinstead relatively easily from London and buses run from East Grinstead to Hartfield village and some spots in the forest. Here’s the best link for transport help https://www.ashdownforest.org/enjoy/tourist/publicTransport.php Buses don’t run all that regularly though. You can walk from Hartfield to the Pooh Bridge relatively easily. It’s a bit more of a walk to get further up into the forest though but doable. Having a car for the area would definitely make it easier. There are some wonderful places to visit nearby, like Penshurst Place and Hever Castle, for example so I would spend a night in the area but again, you should research the public transport options to get around if you don’t want to hire a car for the day. Hope that helps and that you have a wonderful time exploring the area.

  30. 25th September 2017 / 9:11 pm

    This looks so fabulous. We’ve visited Aldenham Country Park in Herts which also has a winnie the pooh trail, this looks so much fun for kids.

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      26th September 2017 / 6:57 pm

      It really is so much fun, Laura. And one of the best things about this trail is that it’s the very place A.A.Milne was writing about!

  31. 25th September 2017 / 9:44 pm

    We live very close to Hartfield but I’ve only been to Pooh Sticks Bridge once!!! This has inspired me. I think I’ll be doing a day trip over half term. Thank you for all the brilliant tips! #MondayEscapes

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      26th September 2017 / 6:58 pm

      You’re very welcome, Zoe. Thanks so much for the lovely comment. The Pooh Sticks Bridge is such a fun place to go. We do love wandering through the forest as well.

  32. 25th September 2017 / 9:55 pm

    this would be a huge hit with mine, they would just LOVE it! Thanks for linking up to #MondayEscapes

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      26th September 2017 / 7:00 pm

      Oh my goodness, yes! It’s such a fabulous day out for kids of all ages.

  33. 27th September 2017 / 6:44 am

    Aww, what a fun little adventure! Such a good idea for little ones!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      2nd October 2017 / 4:48 pm

      Thanks Laura πŸ™‚

  34. 27th September 2017 / 4:59 pm

    Claire this is so adorable I would have loved the do this when the boys were little, it brings back to many happy childhood memories thanks so much for linking up #mondayescapes x

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      2nd October 2017 / 4:49 pm

      Thanks so much, Sarah. My boys still love looking for Pooh in the forest. It’s a great walk too.

  35. Dave
    3rd August 2018 / 4:00 pm

    Hi Clare, absolutely love this guide! I’ll be taking a trip to the Ashdown Forrest next week and this guide is super helpful… last thing I want is to get lost out there haha.
    I’ve also found this walking guide on the Ashdown website and it seems to mention everything except the Tigger Tree, which I’d love to see — your instructions on finding it are a little confusing (I’m sure they’ll be easy enough when I’m actually there), but for the sake of my preperation could you tell me where abouts on the Ashdown map I might find Tigger Tree?
    Thanks again!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      3rd August 2018 / 4:22 pm

      Thanks Dave. Actually, there’s no specific Tigger Tree. But there are lots of trees in the forest that look as though they might be the one that Tigger fell out of. We always find it fun to see if we can guess which one it might have been.

  36. Dave
    3rd August 2018 / 5:12 pm

    Great! Thank you!! I’ll make sure to keep my eyes peeled πŸ˜€

  37. Anja
    21st October 2018 / 7:54 pm

    Went yesterday with my 7y old.sadly didn’t find pooh’s door even after walking path up and down several times.did find Joel’s house though and all in all super day out!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      27th October 2018 / 12:58 pm

      Oh what a shame you didn’t find Pooh’s door. If you walk over the Poohsticks bridge and up the track it’s at the bottom of one of the trees on the left. You can usually spot it because people have left jars of honey and little notes for Pooh at the bottom of the tree! It’s a great day out anyway though.

  38. Lisa Smith
    8th November 2018 / 6:20 pm

    We live in 500 [ 100 acre] wood and often take visitors to see Pooh bridge but unfortunately the tree with the little Pooh door has now sadly been completely removed, stump and all!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      8th November 2018 / 9:20 pm

      Oh Lisa, that’s awful news. We don’t live that far from the forest either and were there this summer and saw the little door. The stump was looking rather dead then though. I do hope they put the door on one of the other trees. Thanks so much for letting me know.

  39. 26th May 2019 / 2:34 am

    Thank you for the idea about Poohsticks game, my kids will love it!

    • Clare Thomson
      Author
      4th June 2019 / 3:46 pm

      I hope so, Kate. It’s such a fun activity!

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